Dictionary of Love
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JOHN CLELAND
RALPH GRIFFITHS
J. F. DU RADIER



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Dictionary of Love
The Dictionary of Love
Keyword Search Adore

Adorer

Is a common term in the love-cant, but begins to be somewhat obsolete, from its being hackneyed out.

Chambermaids, milliners and sempstresses are very fond of adorers: and who can resist such an humble, pathetic strain as See at your feet your poor adorer dies?


To Adore

This sacred word is adopted into the love-language, and proves two things.

First, That the men are perfectly knowing, and acquainted with the vanity of women, who are apt to take themselves for little goddesses, or at least divine creatures.

The Second, That they are not sparing for any expressions they thing may make them lose the small share of sense their vanity may have left them.

I love: love did I say? I adore you! The true meaning of which fine speech is, “The secret of pleasing consists in flattering your self-love, at the expence of your understanding. I am straining hard to persuade you, that you have distracted my brain; not that it is so in the least; but, whilst I laugh at you in my sleeve, for your swallowing this stuff, I may gain wherewith to laugh at you in good earnest.”


Omitted text:
To Adore
A Dictionary of Love (1777)
A Dictionary of Love (1795)

Added text:
“…but, whilst I laugh at you in my sleeve, for you swallowing this stuff, I may gain wherewith to laugh at you in good earnest.∗” (∗A truth worth remembering.)
A Dictionary of Love (1777)
A Dictionary of Love (1795)