Dictionary of Love
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JOHN CLELAND
RALPH GRIFFITHS
J. F. DU RADIER



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WOMEN
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Dictionary of Love
The Dictionary of Love
Keyword Search Calm

Calm

The state of an heart without a passion. Whatever praises women may give to this tranquility, it is a thousand times more insupportable to them, than all the anxieties of love. Whenever, then, they talk in this manner, I admire the calm of a disengaged heart, this means, “Custom has absolutely forbid our sex to complain of having no lovers: it is confessing too many disagreeable things, and almost equal to owning that one has no merit. What is to be done then? dissemble.”

After having once loved, a calm is yet more odious; and indifference, at best, an isipid, uncomfortable state. To get out of it, there is nothing like spreading one's sails to a fresh breeze, though it should blow from another quarter.


Omitted text:
After having once loved, a calm is yet more odious; and indifference, at best, an isipid, uncomfortable state. To get out of it, there is nothing like spreading one's sails to a fresh breeze, though it should blow from another quarter.
A Dictionary of Love (1777)
A Dictionary of Love (1795)


Liberty

The state of a heart which has never loved, or has ceased loving. See Calm . It is often used in a libertine sense, as in this phrase: I dread the marriage-fetters: I love my liberty.

Liberty is the life of Love, which is of the nature of some birds, who refuse all sustenance, and dies, under the least confinement.

I do not like these liberties: this said before company, with a stolen wink, means, “You forget yourself: when we are in private, as much of them as you please: but in public pray be more reserved.”


Omitted text:
The state of a heart which has never loved, or has ceased loving. See Calm. It is often used in a libertine sense, as in this phrase: I dread the marriage-fetters: I love my liberty.
A Dictionary of Love (1777)
A Dictionary of Love (1795)