Dictionary of Love
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JOHN CLELAND
RALPH GRIFFITHS
J. F. DU RADIER



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VERB
NOUN
ADJECTIVE

Courtship Stage:

STARTING
NEGOTIATING
OUTCOME
ANY

Implied Readers:

WOMEN
MEN
BOTH



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Dictionary of Love
The Dictionary of Love
Keyword Search Chains

Chains

A poetical word. My heart can never break your chains, means no more, than that, “I shall always love you.”

In the mouth of a young fellow to an old lady dowager, I cannot break my chains, the English of it is, “I am not such a fool as to break my bank.”

It is good policy sometimes in a woman to relax and extend the chains of her lover; the more she will secure her captive. He would snap too short a chain, who would never dream of breaking a sufficiently long one.


Omitted text:
In the mouth of a young fellow to an old lady dowager, I cannot break my chains, the English of it is, “I am not such a fool as to break my bank.”
A Dictionary of Love (1777)
A Dictionary of Love (1795)