Dictionary of Love
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JOHN CLELAND
RALPH GRIFFITHS
J. F. DU RADIER



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Courtship Stage:

STARTING
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WOMEN
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Dictionary of Love
The Dictionary of Love
Keyword Search Death

Death

This word is ever to be understood metaphorically, and carries no sort of terror with it. It is even so staled, that it now goes for nothing.

The death of a lover is so much in course, that it is as inevitable as in nature: for if the fair is kind, he is to die with joy; if otherwise, of grief: and both equally.

Your cruelty will make me die; signifies, “I have employ'd flames, darts, despair, &c. to persuade you: and now have nothing left by death to pin the basket.”

A living death I die.

Do you wish to see me die? may also mean figuratively, “Do you wish that the lover in should die to you? I am weary of spending so much nonsense, and advancing so little: there are other women in the world. If you do not capitulate soon, I must raise the siege.”


Omitted text:
A living death I die. Do you wish to see me die? may also mean figuratively, “Do you wish that the lover in should die to you? I am weary of spending so much nonsense, and advancing so little: there are other women in the world. If you do not capitulate soon, I must faise the siege.”
A Dictionary of Love (1777)
A Dictionary of Love (1795)