Dictionary of Love
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PUBLICATION HISTORY
JOHN CLELAND
RALPH GRIFFITHS
J. F. DU RADIER



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Courtship Stage:

STARTING
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ANY

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WOMEN
MEN
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Dictionary of Love
The Dictionary of Love
Keyword Search Exclaims

Exclaims

These are amorous interjections, designed for marks of a violent desire of persuading what one does not feel. They also serve to fill up, whilst one is recovering breath from a long period; and when a lover has nothing better to say; or is got out of his depth.

Oh! how cruel you are ! How unjust! This means, “Why do not you believe me? I have done every thing toward persuading you, that a gentle lover should: I have talked: I have sighed: I have been for this hour heaping lies upon lies, till I am at the end of my part.” Besides, these breaks have great power and effect; as they express a disorder that always flatters the woman, who thinks herself the cause of it.


Modified text:
Exclamations
A Dictionary of Love (1777)
A Dictionary of Love (1795)

Added text:
These are amorous interjections…
A Dictionary of Love (1777)
A Dictionary of Love (1795)