Dictionary of Love
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JOHN CLELAND
RALPH GRIFFITHS
J. F. DU RADIER



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VERB
NOUN
ADJECTIVE

Courtship Stage:

STARTING
NEGOTIATING
OUTCOME
ANY

Implied Readers:

WOMEN
MEN
BOTH



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Dictionary of Love
The Dictionary of Love
Keyword Search Graces

Graces

The Heathens, who defied every thing that was amiable, acknowledged three divinities, under the names of Thalia, Aglaë, and Euphrosine, who presided over all the charms of the form and soul. Venus was never without them at her side: they were her premier ministers. Our poets, and our lovers, ever fond of fiction, have adopted these fine ideas: “The Graces accompany you every where.” This stale, thread-bare compliment, and a number of others, in which the Graces are most ungracefully dragged in, have the same signification as charms, beauty, attractions, &c. They have a romantic sound, and do very prettily in poetry.

Sometimes the word is used ironically: as, “Here she comes, with all her airs and graces.”