Dictionary of Love
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JOHN CLELAND
RALPH GRIFFITHS
J. F. DU RADIER



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Dictionary of Love
The Dictionary of Love
Keyword Search Hate

To Hate

Is never understood in a literal sense, but when employed against the ugly and old. In general it is construed in a contrary sense.

A mistress, from whom a favour is extorted by an agreeable violence, whilst she faintly resists, says, Pray, let me alone, I hate you mortally:— This signifies, “Your boldness is far from displeasing me; you may even venture it as far as it will go.”

Can you hate me then? means, “I want to give myself the pleasure of hearing an assurance to the contrary, or of perplexing you, — or of seeing how prettily you can turn a declaration of love.”

I know you hate me; in the mouth of a coxcomb, signifies, “I defy you, for the soul of you, to be otherwise than violently in love with such a pretty fellow as I am.”


Omitted text:
To Hate
A Dictionary of Love (1795)
A Dictionary of Love (1795)

Omitted text:

A mistress, from whom a favour is extorted by an agreeable violence, whilst she faintly resists, says, Pray, let me alone, I hate you mortally: — This signifies, “Your boldness is far from displeasing me; you may even venture it as far as it will go.”

Can you hate me then? means, “I want to give myself the pleasure of hearing an assurance to the contrary, or of perplexing you,— or of seeing how prettily you can turn a declaration of love.”


A Dictionary of Love (1777)
A Dictionary of Love (1795)