Dictionary of Love
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JOHN CLELAND
RALPH GRIFFITHS
J. F. DU RADIER



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Dictionary of Love
The Dictionary of Love
Keyword Search Leave

Forsake, Quit, Leave, Desert, Cast off

This word is almost always joined to a negation, which, for enforcement-sake, is generally accompanied with an oath.

No! madam; never will I forsake you. May heaven forsake me, if I do. This, at the first view, seems to signify, that one prefers the beloved object to one's life: but use teaches us that you should at least suppose to be understood such conditions as follows: “If you have always the same charms in my eyes: If I see no other beauty that pleases me better;” And the like.

Sometimes this term is employed, in the style of a half-pique, to re-animate a languishing passion: Well, cruel, since you drive me from you, since you force me to forsake you, it must be so.

A lover who knows how to say this with a tender air, and if he can squeeze out a few tears, so much the better; will advance his affairs notably: though the English of it is:

“The fear of losing a lover may make you give me some encouragement: if I leave you, it will diminish your train: think of that.”

It is, in short, a hint, that, dropped with art, and well-timed, rarely fails of its effect.

In the mouth of one's mistress, when she says, Faithless wretch! And can you forsake me then? It is as much as to say, “Am I then to have the pain of seeing another possess what I thought my own? What will the world say? Why, that I had not charms enough to fix Silvio, who adores Lucinda: they are every day together: he handed her yesterday into the side-box: they danced together at the last ball. Gods! this is not to be borne.”

Such a thought is enough to turn a woman's head, when it is once possessed with so cruel an idea; and will make her say a thousand impertinences, and commit a thousand more, that will fix the terrible term of forsaken upon her.


Omitted text:
And the like. Sometimes this term is employed, in the style of a half-pique, to re-animate a languishing passion: Well, cruel, since you drive me from you, since you force me to forsake you, it must be so.
A Dictionary of Love (1777)
A Dictionary of Love (1795)


Leave

Leave me; pray leave me: In certain situations, and in the mouth of a mistress to an urgent lover, are terribly critical words, that imply an imminent surrender at discretion. Every pulse is then beating the dead-march of her virtue; and they are such tender deprecations of his taking the advantage of her confessed weakness, that he would be cruel indeed to take her at her word, and leave her.


Omitted text:
To Leave
A Dictionary of Love (1795)