Dictionary of Love
WELCOME



Read or Search the Dictionary

DICTIONARY: TEXT
DICTIONARY: SEARCH



Read about the Dictionary:

PUBLICATION HISTORY
JOHN CLELAND
RALPH GRIFFITHS
J. F. DU RADIER



Select Dictionary Entries by
Random Phrases:

ILLUSTRATIONS

Part of Speech:

VERB
NOUN
ADJECTIVE

Courtship Stage:

STARTING
NEGOTIATING
OUTCOME
ANY

Implied Readers:

WOMEN
MEN
BOTH



Read about the Project:

PROJECT HISTORY
EDITING IN XML
LINGUISTIC ANALYSIS
LITERARY EXAMPLES
BIBLIOGRAPHY



Dictionary of Love
The Dictionary of Love
Keyword Search Run

Run Away

There is nothing left for it but your running away with me. This is rarely hazarded in express terms: but when the fair-one is sufficiently disposed, and her reason destroyed, her artful seducer employs this proposal, though in softened expressions, which at the bottom means as follows:

“Hitherto we have only committed the common follies of love; but now, let us consummate them by a stroke of êclat. I have so perfect a regard for you, that I make use of all the advantage your love gives me over you, to persuade you to take refuge in my arms, from tyrannical parents, whose darling you are, whose life it is necessary to my happiness you should imbitter [sic] for ever: (or perhaps) from a husband who adores you, who is so cruel to you as to want to have you all to himself; and whom you are going to overwhelm with shame and sorrow, whilst my passion lasts; and it will last as long — as it can: I will stand you in the stead of all you lose for my sake: when I am heartily tired of you, I shall arm myself with firmness enough to part with you: you may cry, complain, storm, all will be in vain: then you may go back to your family; that is to say, if it is silly and fond enough to receive you: if not, there are the ever open arms of the town for you.”

All this, the word Run-away implies, though you may be sure so much is never expressed.


Modified text:
“that is to say, if it is fond enough to receive you: if not,the town will receive you with open arms”
A Dictionary of Love (1777)
A Dictionary of Love (1795)

Omitted text:
“…ever open arms of the town for you” All this, the word Run-away implies, though you may be sure so much is never expressed
A Dictionary of Love (1777)
A Dictionary of Love (1795)