Dictionary of Love
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JOHN CLELAND
RALPH GRIFFITHS
J. F. DU RADIER



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Courtship Stage:

STARTING
NEGOTIATING
OUTCOME
ANY

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WOMEN
MEN
BOTH



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Dictionary of Love
The Dictionary of Love
Keyword Search Sick

Sick, Sickness

I am sick with Love. Sure you cannot refuse to cure the pains you cause. — All this pretended sickness, and pain, never intrench [sic] an instant on the lover's pleasure. They never confine him to his room. He can, for all them, go to the plays, gardens, masquerades, and even to a bagnio. They are so little troublesome, that a lover would be sorry to be cured of this imaginary disorder, that amuses him so agreeably, and flatters so much the vanity of the women. In short, lover-sick and sham-sick are synonymous terms.

It were to be wished, that in the states of love there was no more real illness than of this sort; our youth would be less liable to disorders, that send them very seriously to consult the sons of Esculapius.


Modified text:
In short, love-sick and sham-sick are the same thing
A Dictionary of Love (1777)

Omitted text:
…are synonymous terms. It were to be wished, that in the states of love there was no more real illness than of this sort; our youth would be less liable to disorders, that send them very seriously to consult the sons of Esculapius.
A Dictionary of Love (1777)